Sustania 2013

Hardware, how-to, Life, on the Web

Sustainia100 is an annual guide to 100 innovative solutions from around the world that presents readily available projects, initiatives and technologies at the forefront of sustainable transformation.

Our 2013 edition of Sustainia100 was launched June 9th in London. Sustainia received 500+ submissions from 79 countries for this year’s guide. The final 100 solutions are deployed in two thirds of the world’s countries – including Kenya, India, Mexico and South Africa, making the Sustainia100 guide reflect innovation from the traditional western hubs as well as parts of the world that are normally not well covered.

Identifying 100 innovative, sustainable solutions in 10 key sectors, spanning from energy, transportation to fashion, food and education. Sustainia100 gives investors, regional developers, business leaders, politicians, and consumers in-depth insights to the most promising projects and technologies within their field.

Download Sustainia100 here: sustainia.me/solutions

The fine folks at iFixIt have published a post on this Sustania initiave on their blog. Sustainia is an innovation platform in Copenhagen that celebrates today’s top visionaries. These are people who are chipping away at the world’s biggest problems using tangible solutions—all in the pursuit of a sustainable future.

Five hundred applicants, in over 79 countries, sought to be in the running for the 2013 Sustainia Award. Some of this year’s finalists include Liter of Light, TaKaDu, Netural.com, and Tvilight. And iFixit is incredibly humbled and honored to be in the running with them!

Voting is runs from September 19-October 31. The finalist will be decided on and announced by honorary Chair, Arnold Schwarzenegger, as well as the Sustainia committee on November 2, 2013.

CentOS – find packages provided by repositories

CentOS, how-to

A quick note to myself… This is what I do when I need to find which packages are provided by a certain repository. First I update the list of the available packages:

# yum check-update

Then I do a listing of them (bold is mine):

# yum repolist
Loaded plugins: fastestmirror, security
Loading mirror speeds from cached hostfile
* base: mirrors.prometeus.net
* epel: fr2.rpmfind.net
* extras: mirrors.prometeus.net
* updates: mirrors.prometeus.net
Excluding Packages from CentOS-5 - Base
Finished
Excluding Packages from CentOS-5 - Updates
Finished
repo id repo name status
base CentOS-5 - Base 3,612+29
epel Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux 5 - x86_64 7,241
extras CentOS-5 - Extras 266
updates CentOS-5 - Updates 95
repolist: 11,214

At this point, if I need to find what packages are provided by the EPEL repository and write that list on a file, I’ll simply digit:

# rpm -qa | grep epel > epel-list.txt

FUSE, OSX and SSHFS

how-to, OSX, Software

 If you – like me – work everyday on an OS X box with the Terminal.app opened over many remote servers, doing some sysadmin and frequently dealing with files management over & between those remote file systems, you could get some use of the benefits of FUSE technology and it’s porting on the Mac side.

In this way it’s easy as eating a pie to manage files on a remote server, on which we have made access via SSH, thanks to the SSHFS kernel module. We will see those file as a regular shared directory in our LAN with Finder. The easiest way to achieve this is by following this nice how-to published by the Computer Science Department of the University of Oregon:

Mac SSHFS using OSXFUSE and Macfusion →

builing a website for a workshop / meeting

deploy, how-to, ITB CNR

So, nearly a month ago I’ve deployed online with the COST Workshop Barcelona 2013 event website, prepared in a fast-and-furious mode since deadline was approaching and the number of things to do for the committee where overwhelming, so they’ve asked me to help.

To realize that I’ve relied on an old friend of mine, WordPress, that once more confirmed to be a perfect choice to have good-looking and functional, vital, websites.

COST-Workshop-Barcelona-2013-20121206

For the template I choose the free (as in speech) Squirrel theme released from InkThemes, which is a feature-reduced version of the full premium themes. But this didn’t worried me since the good design and code it sports in the free version. Also the static home page layout of the theme is really eye-catching with the right choice of opening images.

A design aware use of the widgets and some plugins made the rest possible and easily re-doable. Among those plugins I find that worth a mention are:

Hope you are enjoying this “disclosure;-)