On social media, you share an article because you agree with the take, sure, but also because it says something about you, whether that fact is that you’re angry about a political issue, or that you like cute bunnies, or that you love Back to the Future. Your social media feed is a curation of things you want people to know about you. Inconvenient truths, negative views, or anything too dark will be pushed aside.
Todd VanDerWerff

So true.

The only feature I’m really missing are Safari content blockers. In case you were wondering, the requirement for this feature is an iOS device with 64-bit processor, which means iPhone 5S or newer, iPad Air or newer, iPad mini 2 or newer, and the 6th-gen iPod touch. As I observed on social networks, slightly older devices would benefit a lot from content blockers, as there are certain sites with so many ads and underlying related code that browsing them is an exercise in frustration and a blow to the device’s general performance. Too bad (and ironic) that they can’t take advantage of this iOS 9 feature.
Riccado “morrick” Mori

This is where Apple differs from a pure web browser vendor like Mozilla, I suppose; Apple has an answer for publishers to the often shitty experience of web advertising: don’t use the web, use apps with iAds, use Apple News, use Apple Music, use Apple… Apple’s answer isn’t a better web, really, it’s Apple’s iOS ecosystem.
Mark Mayo

Emphasis is mine …

So, back to the question: what happened to cyberpunk? The answer is simple. It’s under our noses.

Privacy and security online. Megacorporations with the same rights as human beings. Failures of the system to provide for the very poor. The struggle to establish identity that is not dependent on a technological framework: the common themes of the cyberpunk classics are the vital issues of 2012. Quite simply, we’re already there, and so of course cyberpunk as a genre is unfashionable: current events always are. Even William Gibson and Neal Stephenson don’t write science fiction anymore. Why bother? We live immersed in the cyberpunk culture that its O.G. prophets envisioned.

Thanks to zBrando for linking this piece from Motherboard

Right now vendors have no real incentive to offer any kind of compatibility with each other. Instead they’re all trying to define their own ecosystems with their own incompatible protocols with the aim of forcing users to continue buying from them. Worse, they attempt to restrict developers from implementing any kind of compatibility layers. The inevitable outcome is going to be either stacks of discarded devices speaking abandoned protocols or a cottage industry of developers writing bridge code and trying to avoid DMCA takedowns.

The dystopian future we’re heading towards isn’t Gibsonian giant megacorporations engaging in physical warfare, it’s one where buying a new toaster means replacing all your lightbulbs or discovering that the code making your home alarm system work is now considered a copyright infringement. Is there a market where I can invest in IP lawyers?
Mattew Garret