… there isn’t a better time than when you’re completely removed from such routine, that you can zoom out and take a better look at it. And you start noticing little silly things, like the amount of effort and energies you must invest to keep up-to-date with what goes on in technology (and many other disciplines) today, to then be able to add your voice to that cauldron of a debate, which keeps getting bigger every day and you end up drowning in irrelevancy most of the time anyway.

Writing online today, no matter how often you ‘show up’, often feels like a permanent state of paying one’s dues. Authority is achieved randomly: the public doesn’t seem to care if you’ve written about technology for the past 12 years or for just a few weeks. If the right people link to your piece and appreciate it, it’s a brilliant contribution and you’re worthy of attention, at least for a few days. You soon find out that you’re organising your approach to follow that model, so you read a lot, write a lot (quantity and ‘showing up’ frequency over quality), and every day you sit at your computer or mobile device and you’ve basically become a hamster spinning in your wheel.
Riccardo Mori

The Great Disconnect

blogging, Life

2 thoughts on “The Great Disconnect

    1. He was on vacations. As me and you, I don’t think he could imagine living (working) without the web.
      Also, sometimes this make me think I’ve chose a wrong job. I got no skill that can help in “the wild” of the world … A mason, a dentist, a farmer are probably more “fit“ job careers😉

      Like

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