Transloader, download a file on your Mac while working with your iPhone / iPad

Transloader running on a Mac

Ever come across a large zip or dmg file you wanted to download on your iPhone? Of course, you can’t do it. But with Transloader, you can. How? Transloader lets you download URLs from your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch directly to your Mac via iCloud.

Today, thanks to TwoDollarsTuesday, this amazing app by Matthias Gansrigler – founder & main developer of Eternal Storms Software – has been available with a stunning -67% discounted price.

With Transloader you can get the URLs to any kind of file you discover while reading an email, a feed or a post while you’re on the move with your iPhone (or iPad and iPod touch too) and it will sync them to your Mac for download. The iOS app is freely available, while the OS X “client” is the application you pay for.

The app is extremely useful – to me at least!!! – and Matthias Gansrigler is that cool kind of developer always willing to give an hand, offer support and – amazingly – even promo codes to his most loyal followers (don’t you believe me? check him out!).

Astropad, getting a graphic tablet out of your iPad

Released last week, ASTROPAD is one of the most interesting software released in the Apple ecosystem in these last few months.

Pairing a free app on the iOS device, with it’s counterpart on OS X, it enables a two way communications between the video of your Mac and the input capabilities of the touch display of the iPad, becoming de-facto a graphic tablet (like a Wacom).

At download time you have a 7 days, full featured, trial period. Then you’ll have to pay ~50$ for it. From the fist test I’ve done with some friends the app behaves better with tools like Photoshop, Pixelmator and such… other than some CAD, where it misses some keyboard integrations.

The developers are really active and interacts with their customers (potential ones too), so be sure to follow @astropadapp also on Twitter…

iBetterCharge, never again an iPhone with low battery

iBetterCharge is a free utility made by the software house Softorino that you have to install on your Mac. After that you have to pair your iPhone when connected via USB, then you can unplug it. iBetterCharge then runs in background and monitors the battery status of the iPhone. When it reaches a specific level, you get an alert via Notification Center so that you can charge it.

You don’t have to install anything on your iPhone, since the pooling happens with the Wi-Fi sync protocol you have to choose inside iTunes. I have to thank Brett Terpstra for pointing this out over App.net,

a real BIG problem with iOS Health apps

Since last December I’m an owner of a brand new iPhone 6. Coming from an iPhone 5 I’ve finally encountered the benefits of the M8 movement coprocessor and started to use (again) Moves, Breeze and the bundled iOS Health app. After a couple of weeks’ usage, since I had forgotten my restriction unlock code, and after having shot a lot of christmas photos with my family, I’ve decided to clean things up and reset my iPhone and start clean removing old and unused app, with fresh music and photo library and … discovered a completely missing 15 days of personal dataset previously saved inside the Health app but NOT synchronized over any “cloud” system whatsoever. iCloud included, where I was expecting they were waiting to be restored.

Personally I have enjoyed saving and then visualizing my health data on the device, monitoring how I am doing over the time with sleep, activity, blood pressure, heartbeats and such. But if this history is not kept / exportable / re-usable elsewhere then this health-kit API it’s only a commercial trick to sell stuff and not to build something that lasts. And Apple (or anybody else) doesn’t certainly need this when they convince us to me so thoroughly 24 hours a day…

A concept that makes it easier for a good samaritan to return a lost iPhone

Lost_Mode_iOS-mode

I’ve recently read the article on Medium.com regarding and discussing an idea on how Apple could help “good samaritans” whose, finding our lost iOS device – and particularly an iPhone, to contact the device’s owner with ease. Thing that now it’s not so easy to do if the phone is locked by a code, or anyway request the finder to dig into our address book, or contact list, or recent phone calls…

I’ve liked it so much that I’ve used the Apple contact form to fill-in a request citing this article directly.

→ Check it out!