… there isn’t a better time than when you’re completely removed from such routine, that you can zoom out and take a better look at it. And you start noticing little silly things, like the amount of effort and energies you must invest to keep up-to-date with what goes on in technology (and many other disciplines) today, to then be able to add your voice to that cauldron of a debate, which keeps getting bigger every day and you end up drowning in irrelevancy most of the time anyway.

Writing online today, no matter how often you ‘show up’, often feels like a permanent state of paying one’s dues. Authority is achieved randomly: the public doesn’t seem to care if you’ve written about technology for the past 12 years or for just a few weeks. If the right people link to your piece and appreciate it, it’s a brilliant contribution and you’re worthy of attention, at least for a few days. You soon find out that you’re organising your approach to follow that model, so you read a lot, write a lot (quantity and ‘showing up’ frequency over quality), and every day you sit at your computer or mobile device and you’ve basically become a hamster spinning in your wheel.
Riccardo Mori

write 10 minutes every day

The 2016 edition of WordCamp Europe in Vienna was huge. There were lots of really good moments. Here’s the Andrea Badgley speech with the topic of daily blogging in her: Publish in 10 Minutes Per Day →

I’ll try to do this in the coming weeks, since I feel I am loosing confidence in writing out my feelings and ideas …

[Thanks to Luca Sartoni for putting the spotlight on this, I am digging with the technical speeches at the moment]

On choosing the right theme

Just ten days ago I was writing about a theme change on these pages, adopting the Hew theme.

Along with finding a bug on it, I’ve also discovered that one-column templates (like this Celsius one I am using right now) simply works when you are really focused on a topic. Unfortunately this is not my case in the last months, where I do not have the time … or, better, the required concentration, to write here more extensively. So I keep posting links and videos and a casual user has a problem in finding the topics I’ve spoken in the last 10 years …

As in the next 10 days I have a job to fulfill, I will not have time to make a deep search in the list of the available free themes on WordPress.com … so if you land here via a browser you could see things changing.

Also, I am very interested in the process you make choosing a template for your site. Mind to share? Thanks!

Seems like the Publisher theme didn’t help my contents to be seen and explored by the visitors that comes in. So, hits on these pages have precipitate in a consistent way.

Having nothing to lose, I’ve activated the Hew theme, which is more minimal than ever. This as an experiment to see if removing navigation elements like menus and tag clouds on the sidebars makes a difference or not. We will see…

John O’Nolan founder of Ghost on blogging

The State of Casual Blogging →

Following the river of thoughts flowing from my last post, yesterday I found out this piece by John O’Nolan (long time developer of WordPress and founder of Ghost) expressing his personal view on the topic. I’ve liked in particular the following words:

There is more than enough room in the publishing industry for open and closed platforms to exist in harmony, catering to different types of writers with their individual advantages.

This point of view is respectful of every point of view, and I think that in ultimate analysis is THE final answer to the question of where one has to blog. And it’s where you’re most comfortable doing so…