Keeping ads out of my browsing with Pi-Hole

After discovering this project, I brought a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B from french company Kubii and started configuring it. I’m struggling to make it work, but I fear that the problem is with the wi-fi setting of my Raspbian connection.

Anyway give an eye to the Pi-Hole project

The Pi-hole is an advertising-aware DNS server that prevents ads from being downloaded. Once installed, configure your router to have DHCP clients use the Pi as their DNS server and then any device that connects to your network will have ads blocked without any further configuration. Alternatively, you can manually set each device to use the Raspberry Pi as its DNS server.

open source coming to automotive

 

Ford, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Toyota: all driving more Linux into cars

sdlGreat news for use consumers. Let’s hope that this SmartDeviceLink technology takes gear, gathering more automotive Big Names and a good amount of indipendent developers to it !

Tomcat 7, munin and Ubuntu 14.04

Lately I had to reconfigure an Ubuntu 14.04 server.
Dealing with Tomcat 7 I’ve encountered those two situations:

Enable larger file uploads via Tomcat manager

I had a ~180 war file to deploy. Ubuntu’s Tomcat setting put a limit at 50MB. This has been solved using the tips in this post by skotfred. Unfortunately I haven’t found a more orthodox way of achieving this other than modify the /usr/share/tomcat7-admin/manager/WEB-INF/web.xml in the values max-file-size and max-request-size.

Enable Tomcat monitoring in Munin

Here I’ve followed the tips over this Serverfault discussions.
Adding a [tomcat_ *] was the key.

an amazing guide through the steps required to security harden CentOS 7

Security Harden CentOS 7 →

Ian Murdock, R.I.P.

Ian Murdock

With a heavy heart Debian mourns the passing of Ian Murdock, stalwart proponent of Free Open Source Software, Father, Son, and the ‘ian’ in Debian.

Ian started the Debian project in August of 1993, releasing the first versions of Debian later that same year. Debian would go on to become the world’s Universal Operating System, running on everything from embedded devices to the space station.

His family has asked for privacy during this difficult time and we very much wish to respect that. Within our Debian and the larger Linux community condolences may be sent to in-memoriam-ian@debian.org where they will be kept and archived.

via →

How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X

How-to create an Ubuntu bootable USB stick on OS X →

Manually remove a broken package on Debian/Ubuntu

The other day, after a do-release-update on an Ubuntu box I had some issues with a package which told me:

Errors were encountered while processing:
BROKEN-PACKAGE
E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)

here’s how I solved:

mv /var/lib/dpkg/info/BROKEN-PACKAGE.* /tmp/
dpkg --remove --force-remove-reinstreq BROKEN-PACKAGE

(via)

about DRM on Streaming Services

A decade ago, arguments against DRM for downloaded music focused on the claim that users should have control over the music they purchase. Although these arguments may not seem to apply to subscription services, it is worth remembering that DRM is fundamentally a problem because it means that we do not have control of the technology we use to play our music, and because the firms aiming to control us are using DRM to push antifeatures, raise prices, and block innovation. In all of these senses, DRM in streaming services is exactly as bad as FairPlay, and we should continue to demand better.

via Benjamin Mako Hill

solving DESeq2 installation issues

At work a colleague asked me to do a system-wide installation of the R module DESeq2 in one of our internal servers.
The installation procedure is quite straight-forward:

source("http://bioconductor.org/biocLite.R")
biocLite("DESeq2")

Unfortunately I had some issues on my system, in fact I got:

…
Warning in fun(libname, pkgname) :
couldn't connect to display "localhost:12.0"
* DONE (maSigPro)

The downloaded source packages are in
	‘/tmp/RtmpfdD2RC/downloaded_packages’
Warning messages:
1: In install.packages(pkgs = doing, lib = lib, ...) :
  installation of package ‘XML’ had non-zero exit status
2: In install.packages(pkgs = doing, lib = lib, ...) :
  installation of package ‘annotate’ had non-zero exit status
3: In install.packages(pkgs = doing, lib = lib, ...) :
  installation of package ‘genefilter’ had non-zero exit status
4: In install.packages(pkgs = doing, lib = lib, ...) :
  installation of package ‘geneplotter’ had non-zero exit status
5: In install.packages(pkgs = doing, lib = lib, ...) :
  installation of package ‘DESeq2’ had non-zero exit status

I then tried to install manually the various dependencies, like XML. Still no luck. After a quick Google search I found that I was missing a couple of -dev packages on my Ubuntu machine, so I installed them:

root@server:~# apt-get install libcurl4-openssl-dev libxml2-dev

… and then re-tried to install DESeq2. This time everything was ok. Problem solved!

why I should _____ openSUSE?

Why openSUSE →

Richard Brown, a long-time SuSE/openSUSE user and now openSUSE Board Chairman & QA Engineer at SUSE explains the pro of being involved – as an user and/or as a developer – with openSUSE project and community. Worth a read!