Tomcat 7, munin and Ubuntu 14.04

Lately I had to reconfigure an Ubuntu 14.04 server.
Dealing with Tomcat 7 I’ve encountered those two situations:

Enable larger file uploads via Tomcat manager

I had a ~180 war file to deploy. Ubuntu’s Tomcat setting put a limit at 50MB. This has been solved using the tips in this post by skotfred. Unfortunately I haven’t found a more orthodox way of achieving this other than modify the /usr/share/tomcat7-admin/manager/WEB-INF/web.xml in the values max-file-size and max-request-size.

Enable Tomcat monitoring in Munin

Here I’ve followed the tips over this Serverfault discussions.
Adding a [tomcat_ *] was the key.

Convince your company to contribute to Debian Long Term Support

The press picked up the recent press release about Debian LTS but mainly to mention the fact that it’s up and running. The call for help is almost never mentioned.

It’s a pity because while it’s up, it’s not really running satisfactorily yet. As of today (2014-06-19), 36 packages in squeeze need a security update, yet squeeze-lts has only seen 7 updates.

debian-lts-periodsAs usual what we lack is contributors doing the required work, but in this specific case, there’s a simple solution: pay people to do the required work. This extended support is mainly for the benefit of corporate users and if they see value in Debian LTS, it should not be too difficult to convince companies to support the project.

With some other Debian developers, we have gone out of our way to make it super easy for companies to support the Debian LTS project. We have created a service offer for Debian-using companies.

via Raphael Hertzog website…

The Debian Administrator’s Handbook

Written by two Debian developers — Raphaël Hertzog and Roland Mas — the Debian Administrator’s Handbook started as a translation of their French best-seller known as Cahier de l’admin Debian (published by Eyrolles).

It’s a fantastic resource for all users of a Debian-based distribution.

Accessible to all, this book teaches the essentials to anyone who wants to become an effective and independant Debian GNU/Linux administrator.

Given that traditional editors did not want to take the risk to make this translation, we decided to do the translation ourselves and to self-publish the result. After a successful crowdfunding campaign, we managed to complete this translation between December 2011 and May 2012.

To live up to our free software ideals, we wanted the book to be freely available (that is under the terms of a license compatible with the Debian Free Software Guidelines of course). There was a condition though: a liberation fund had to be completed to ensure we had a decent compensation for the work that the book represents. This fund reached its target of €25K in April 2012.

via The Debian Administrator’s Handbook.