… there isn’t a better time than when you’re completely removed from such routine, that you can zoom out and take a better look at it. And you start noticing little silly things, like the amount of effort and energies you must invest to keep up-to-date with what goes on in technology (and many other disciplines) today, to then be able to add your voice to that cauldron of a debate, which keeps getting bigger every day and you end up drowning in irrelevancy most of the time anyway.

Writing online today, no matter how often you ‘show up’, often feels like a permanent state of paying one’s dues. Authority is achieved randomly: the public doesn’t seem to care if you’ve written about technology for the past 12 years or for just a few weeks. If the right people link to your piece and appreciate it, it’s a brilliant contribution and you’re worthy of attention, at least for a few days. You soon find out that you’re organising your approach to follow that model, so you read a lot, write a lot (quantity and ‘showing up’ frequency over quality), and every day you sit at your computer or mobile device and you’ve basically become a hamster spinning in your wheel.
Riccardo Mori

The Great Disconnect

blogging, Life

linklog-logo-transparent

Life, Linklog

To borrow from Bernie Sanders’s stump speech, the richest 1 percent in America have almost 40 percent of our country’s wealth, while the bottom 90 percent have 73 percent of the debt. This is largely the result of technology. And just wait until our work force is truly affected by the rise of robots and automation.
Nick Bilton

Are We at the Start of a Tech World War?

Life, Technology

The older I’ve grown the more I’ve come to realise that I can’t do it all. It’s far better for me to focus on getting great at a few things and let someone else, who is an master at things that I am not, do what they do best.

This is definitely not always practical but the more tasks I can outsource, the more time I have to become a master of the things that I want to get good at.
Matt Geri

You can’t do it all. Or You?

Life
job-automation

About the Fourth Industrial Revolution consequences

Life

5 million jobs to be lost by 2020 →

A really interesting read. If you’re not into retirement in the next five years, for me it’s mandatory to begin to think at what our job possibility will be…

What will happen to jobs?
According to the Forum’s Future of Jobs report, some jobs will be wiped out, others will be in high demand, but all in all, around 5 million jobs will be lost.
Already jobs exist now that had never been heard of five years ago: the role of data scientist, which is in huge demand, is one example.