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I support Stories of Apple. You should too…

It’s a know fact my long time friendship with Nicola D’Agostino. It’s also known that we share a certain number of passion and interests, among with the software and the hardware made in Cupertino, California. And lots of times here, on Twitter and around the web I’ve talked about some cool content on his project Stories of Apple

Storie di Apple - logo

Today I’d like to spend some more words on this project, inviting you to support this historiographical job that he’s making since 2007 (in this form). Staring with a 2$/month contribute you can sponsor his work thanks to the crowdfunding site  Patreon.
With this money we can support his job maintaining 2 websites, 1 Instagram account, a rich Tumblr profile and some exclusive content over Patreon website itself…

If I get enough support by readers on Patreon, I will be able to write more original stuff and even try my hand at some more ambitious projects, like regular columns and videos.
Nicola D’Agostino

Over the Patreon platform you will be able to check the level of support you’re more comfortable: starting with the Vice President level (2$ per month) up to  iCEO (15$ or more per month) 😀 … each with his own level of benefits and ‘power’ in the future of the project.
As in any of his actions, very politely and humbly Nicola has decided to undertake this financing road to better realize this enormous job of documenting Apple (and computing) history over the decades, avoiding the worst form of monetization available today (banners, targeted ads, hidden referral links and so on). He respects his readers, but he’s in a position to ask for help to go on…

I have decided to support Stories Of Apple and this take on web content publications by Nicola, and I’ve started as a Vice President… if we ‘all’ join in we can contribute to enrich the Web with a little and shiny diamond…

Be a Stories of Apple supporter on Patreon

 

5. Engage in dialogue with people who are different from you.
One of the hardest things is to understand the other side. The rift between groups of people, conflict, and controversy is what clickbait thrives on. Squelch it. This is probably the hardest one to do, because we are hardwired to block out people we disagree with. Get off Facebook. Talk to people in good comment sections. Visit sites with comments. Encourage your favorite publication to moderate comments. Volunteer to be a moderator.

This does not mean subjecting yourself to pointless, toxic arguments with people who can’t be convinced. It does not mean ruining your mental health in comment sections that are not civil. It means, little by little working to change minds, and engaging with the internet around us.

We are a LONG, long ways away from the destruction of the internet as a giant billboard. It takes time to turn a huge skyscraper into an gutted shell of a building, and it will take just as much time to turn our current internet from a loud, obnoxious, toxic mall, back into a public forum.
Vicki Boykis, Fix the internet by writing good stuff and being nice to people

Perhaps more people would think twice if the label for Facebook read:

Everything you say and do on Facebook will be used against you by advertisers for targeting that’s most likely to catch you at your most vulnerable, needy moment. Your consumption of the echo chamber timeline will lead to a narrower field of vision of the world. We may try to tinker with your mental well-being at any time, if we determine that a depressed state increases engagement on the A/B by any margin.
David Heinemeier Hansson – The price of monetizing schemes

What should I think about when I use Facebook?

What does this all mean? Essentially, it means that every single thing you do on Facebook, and if you’re logged in, on other websites, is potentially tracked by Facebook, and saved on their servers.

To be clear, every company currently does some form of this tracking of users. There would simply be no other way to measure operations. But Facebook has quite clearly been tiptoeing outside the bounds of what is ethically acceptable data business practices for a while. Even if Facebook is currently not doing some of the things I mentioned (capturing pre-posts, messing with the News Feed,) they’re doing very similar work and there’s no guarantee of privacy or not being used in an experiment. It also means if you’re not active on Facebook, you could still be tracked.

Every single like you gave a post, every friend you added, every place you checked in, every product category you clicked on, every photo, is saved to Facebook and aggregated.

And, as Facebook points out, There is no such thing as privacy on Facebook.

Essentially, what this means is that you need to go into Facebook assuming every single thing you do will be made public, or could be used for advertising, or analyzed by a government agency.

Please take your time to fully read this piece by Vicki Boykis (published over Github): What should you think about when using Facebook?