What should I think about when I use Facebook?

What does this all mean? Essentially, it means that every single thing you do on Facebook, and if you’re logged in, on other websites, is potentially tracked by Facebook, and saved on their servers.

To be clear, every company currently does some form of this tracking of users. There would simply be no other way to measure operations. But Facebook has quite clearly been tiptoeing outside the bounds of what is ethically acceptable data business practices for a while. Even if Facebook is currently not doing some of the things I mentioned (capturing pre-posts, messing with the News Feed,) they’re doing very similar work and there’s no guarantee of privacy or not being used in an experiment. It also means if you’re not active on Facebook, you could still be tracked.

Every single like you gave a post, every friend you added, every place you checked in, every product category you clicked on, every photo, is saved to Facebook and aggregated.

And, as Facebook points out, There is no such thing as privacy on Facebook.

Essentially, what this means is that you need to go into Facebook assuming every single thing you do will be made public, or could be used for advertising, or analyzed by a government agency.

Please take your time to fully read this piece by Vicki Boykis (published over Github): What should you think about when using Facebook?


Go for lunch
This is the single best piece of business advice I can share with you: meet with people. Lunch is a great way to keep in touch, strengthen friendships, and sometimes be in the right place at the right time. At our studio, we stumbled into more (and often substantial) new work, just by sitting down with past/prospective clients over a burger and fries.

via Eric Karjaluoto

App.net is closing …

… and I’m a little sadder today. I’ve enjoyed using it – even if on a free tier – and the quality of overall discussion and the education and kindness of the people I found there.
Thanks to all those involved. It’s been a pleasure for me.

Ultimately, we failed to overcome the chicken-and-egg issue between application developers and user adoption of those applications. We envisioned a pool of differentiated, fast-growing third-party applications would sustain the numbers needed to make the business work. Our initial developer adoption exceeded expectations, but that initial excitement didn’t ultimately translate into a big enough pool of customers for those developers. This was a foreseeable risk, but one we felt was worth taking.

A sincere thanks to the folks that supported and built App.net.

— Dalton & Bryan

via: http://blog.app.net/2017/01/12/app-net-is-shutting-down