A Word on Empathy

We are so zoomed into our consumers, observing them as if they are a new species from another planet, we fail to see the bigger picture. The culture, politics, philosophy, environment, TV shows, books, movies, art, fashion – the world at large. We will not understand what people need and want by simply observing them. We have to experience their world for ourselves. It’s only then we can change it.

Tobias van Schneider

drinking HOT coffee, tea can hurt you

An interesting find by a this study:

Drinking very hot tea linked with risk of 1 type of oesophageal cancer

“Drinking piping hot tea or coffee could ‘double your risk of developing tumours in the oesophagus’,” reports the Mail Online. A study of more than 50,000 people in Iran showed that those who drank 700ml (about 2 to 3 mugs) of black tea a day at temperatures of 60C or above were almost twice as likely to go on to get oesophageal cancer during 10 years of follow-up in the study, compared with people who drank tea at lower temperatures.

The machine stops

Much of this, remarkably, was envisaged by E. M. Forster in his 1909 story “The Machine Stops,” in which he imagined a future where people live underground in isolated cells, never seeing one another and communicating only by audio and visual devices. In this world, original thought and direct observation are discouraged—“Beware of first-hand ideas!” people are told. Humanity has been overtaken by “the Machine,” which provides all comforts and meets all needs—except the need for human contact. One young man, Kuno, pleads with his mother via a Skype-like technology, “I want to see you not through the Machine. . . . I want to speak to you not through the wearisome Machine.”
He says to his mother, who is absorbed in her hectic, meaningless life, “We have lost the sense of space. . . . We have lost a part of ourselves. . . . Cannot you see . . . that it is we that are dying, and that down here the only thing that really lives is the Machine?”
This is how I feel increasingly often about our bewitched, besotted society, too.

Oliver Sacks, the New Yorker