When did you get your first computer?

The first computer I remember really well was my dad’s work laptop he brought home in the beginning of the 1990s. It must have cost a fortune, but my dad always had a very relaxed attitude around computers.

I remember dad saying that there’s nothing permanently bad we can do with a computer – a bold statement in the era without automatic backups and when everyone else was advising kids not to touch the expensive computers! As a result me and my siblings created stories, drawings, games and probably removed the operating system a few times. But most importantly we developed a fearless and creative attitude towards technology.

Linda Liukas

The closing phrase continues to make me think about when and how introduce ‘computers‘ to my son. At 9 months he’s already aware that the TV-remote and our smartphones are things to play with… and while the remote is just a tool like any toy in the box, the smartphone screen with its neverending source of music and video is a temptation that I do not want him to indulge with…

Do you have a child? How soon and in what forms did you let him/her play with smartphones and tablets?

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suggested reads for April 15, 2018

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Suggested reads for July 30, 2017

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Fix the internet by writing good stuff and being nice to people

5. Engage in dialogue with people who are different from you.
One of the hardest things is to understand the other side. The rift between groups of people, conflict, and controversy is what clickbait thrives on. Squelch it. This is probably the hardest one to do, because we are hardwired to block out people we disagree with. Get off Facebook. Talk to people in good comment sections. Visit sites with comments. Encourage your favorite publication to moderate comments. Volunteer to be a moderator.

This does not mean subjecting yourself to pointless, toxic arguments with people who can’t be convinced. It does not mean ruining your mental health in comment sections that are not civil. It means, little by little working to change minds, and engaging with the internet around us.

We are a LONG, long ways away from the destruction of the internet as a giant billboard. It takes time to turn a huge skyscraper into an gutted shell of a building, and it will take just as much time to turn our current internet from a loud, obnoxious, toxic mall, back into a public forum.
Vicki Boykis, Fix the internet by writing good stuff and being nice to people