suggested reads for April 2, 2018

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OK, I know … today’s Easter Monday and the sun shines and the weather is fantastic (at least here). Perfect day for going out and have a wonderful offline time. But if you’re not in such position – or mood – and want to relax at home reading something, here are my ‘classic’ five link list of posts worth a mention…

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suggested reads for March 18, 2018

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What’s up with Firefox, the browser that time forgot?

I have no idea if Mozilla can rescue Firefox and make it into something special again. And I’m not a foe of apps and search, or of Google and Apple. But I’m rooting for Firefox, because I think the big platform companies, for whom the browser isn’t a central product anymore, need competition. And I think a healthy, widely-used web matters.
Walt Mossberg, via ReCode

Choose Firefox Now, Or Later You Won’t Get A Choice

So if you want an Internet — which means, in many ways, a world — that isn’t controlled by Google, you must stop using Chrome now and encourage others to do the same. If you don’t, and Google wins, then in years to come you’ll wish you had a choice and have only yourself to blame for spurning it now.

Of course, Firefox is the best alternative :-). We have a good browser, and lots of dedicated and brilliant people improving it. Unlike Apple and Microsoft, Mozilla is totally committed to the standards-based Web platform as a long-term strategy against lock-in. And one thing I can say for certain is that of all the contenders, Mozilla is least likely to establish world domination :-).
Robert O’Callahan

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suggested reads for July 24, 2016

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Firefox, Google, SSL certificates and connections … and Kaspersky

no-kasperskyThe Set-up
A system with Microsoft Windows operating system, Firefox as browser, Kaspersky as the antivirus.

When you try to load a god-forgotten page like google.com (or after trying to use the embedded web search box in Firefox) you end up with an error page. Unknown SSL certificate and a mysterious SEC_ERROR_UNKNOWN_ISSUER message…

My comment
aaaaalright!

Solution
It seems that Kaspersky puts its hands quite heavily on the connections made by a Windows computer (if I Google for that I got over 107-thousands results). What can you do? First carefully check all the configuration options that the Antivirus makes available. Then, if you cannot solve, please be aware that Kaspersky installs its own “master” SSL certificate, against of every other certificate will be “compared” … This file is also not read automagically by Firefox (even if installed at system level) … So you have to dig in your computer’s file system, and then manually install over Mozilla’s browser.

Only in this way – at last – those little and insignificant Google company SSL cert is being recognized and you can go on your browsing. The SSL file to load is called ‘(fake)Kaspersky Anti-Virus personal root certificate.cer’ and you have to check for it on those locations, given your Windows version:

  • Windows 2000 / XP – %AllUsersProfile%\Application Data\Kaspersky Lab\AVP60MP4\Data\Cert\
  • Windows Vista / 7 – %AllUsersProfile%\Kaspersky Lab\AVP60MP4\Data\Cert\
  • else a path like C:\ProgramData\Kaspersky Lab\AVP16.0.0\Data\Cert\

[As a more precise technical reference you can use this document or this post over  Kaspersky websites]


Alternative solution: change your antivirus … ASAP!

We need more Firefoxes.

We need more browsers that treat their users, rather than publishers, as their customers. It’s the natural cycle of concentration-disruption-renewal that has kept the Web vibrant for nearly 20 years (eons, in web-years).

We may never get another one, though.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), once the force for open standards that kept browsers from locking publishers to their proprietary capabilities, has changed its mission. Since 2013, the organization has provided a forum where today’s dominant browser companies and the dominant entertainment companies can collaborate on a system to let our browsers control our behavior, rather than the other way.

Cory Doctorow, Save Firefox

Firefox dumping Google as default search engine, what’s to expect?

As Firefox dumps Google for Yahoo, is the clock ticking for Mozilla? →

A nice, facts/money-checking, post via TheGuardian.com on the incoming move by Mozilla Foundation to replace Google as the default search engine in favor of locally choosen alternatives (Yahoo, Baidu, Yandex & co.)