Thunderbird, finally a 64bit software

Thunderbird 60.2.1 info 2018-10-15Thanks to a system reinstallation, due to an upgrade to an SSD drive, I’ve casually discovered that there’s a recently release of the version 60.2.1 of Thunderbird, my preferred e-mail client since the ‘death of Eudora’ (a couple of years before 2006).

I was really surprised by the missing update notification from the software. Going to the official website I begun to understand…

Thunderbird version 60.0 is only offered as direct download from thunderbird.net and not as upgrade from Thunderbird version 52 or earlier. A future version 60.1 will provide updates from earlier versions.

System Requirements: • Window: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 or later • Mac: Mac OS X 10.9 or later • Linux: GTK+ 3.4 or higher.

This was in August; during the following months something clearly happened in the builds, so we’ve been faced directly to version 60.2.1 at the beginning of October::

Thunderbird version 60.2.1 provides an automatic update from Thunderbird version 52. Note that Thunderbird version 60.1.0 and 60.2.0 were skipped.

… then probably the broadcast message of the available update should have been clearly delayed to avoid servers overload, and I’ve ‘discovered’ it before it was sent to me.

The list of new features is big; at a glance we can see three of them: the executable is finally a 64-bit one, there’s a new icon and the overall look and feel has been cleaned and polished, it’s finally here the new plugin/extension behavior we’ve seen on Firefox from the beginning of the year. At the first reboot of Thunderbird it will update the Lightning plugin – which covers the calendar functions – and then marks as incompatible and de-activates all the old extensions.

I’ve been using it all day, and so far I can tell it’s a safe upgrade.
Given you don’t rely on any special feature provided by the extensions you have. In that case I suggest you to investigate if the developer is working on an update or if someone has made a fork or a replacement of that particular plugin feature.

update

A friend of mine over my Italian blog made me notice that Windows users are still prompted with a 32-bit application download.

After a little research I’ve discovered that on Windows the 64-bit support is still considered ‘experimental’, while on macOS and Linux there are no problems. You can read more about this HERE.

Anyway Mozilla provides the 64.bit executable directly on their FTP repository, here: https://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/thunderbird/releases/60.2.1/win64/en-US … It’s not provided directly in the download page of the product.

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suggested reads for April 2, 2018

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OK, I know … today’s Easter Monday and the sun shines and the weather is fantastic (at least here). Perfect day for going out and have a wonderful offline time. But if you’re not in such position – or mood – and want to relax at home reading something, here are my ‘classic’ five link list of posts worth a mention…

Mozilla is desperately needed to save the web, but does it stand a chance?

Our world is increasingly mediated by the internet, and that internet has just a few gatekeepers, collecting tolls as we browse. As Python guru Matt Harrison put it, “Vendors control the default browser which 99.9% of people use.” Those vendors are happy to sell us access to information. Nothing about it is free.

Mozilla is desperately needed to save the web, but does it stand a chance?

A nice article by Matt Asay about Mozilla’s role to be our bulwark against the the closure of the web…

What’s up with Firefox, the browser that time forgot?

I have no idea if Mozilla can rescue Firefox and make it into something special again. And I’m not a foe of apps and search, or of Google and Apple. But I’m rooting for Firefox, because I think the big platform companies, for whom the browser isn’t a central product anymore, need competition. And I think a healthy, widely-used web matters.
Walt Mossberg, via ReCode

Choose Firefox Now, Or Later You Won’t Get A Choice

So if you want an Internet — which means, in many ways, a world — that isn’t controlled by Google, you must stop using Chrome now and encourage others to do the same. If you don’t, and Google wins, then in years to come you’ll wish you had a choice and have only yourself to blame for spurning it now.

Of course, Firefox is the best alternative :-). We have a good browser, and lots of dedicated and brilliant people improving it. Unlike Apple and Microsoft, Mozilla is totally committed to the standards-based Web platform as a long-term strategy against lock-in. And one thing I can say for certain is that of all the contenders, Mozilla is least likely to establish world domination :-).
Robert O’Callahan

via →

We need more Firefoxes.

We need more browsers that treat their users, rather than publishers, as their customers. It’s the natural cycle of concentration-disruption-renewal that has kept the Web vibrant for nearly 20 years (eons, in web-years).

We may never get another one, though.

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), once the force for open standards that kept browsers from locking publishers to their proprietary capabilities, has changed its mission. Since 2013, the organization has provided a forum where today’s dominant browser companies and the dominant entertainment companies can collaborate on a system to let our browsers control our behavior, rather than the other way.

Cory Doctorow, Save Firefox

Content blocking is the web at its best

This is where Apple differs from a pure web browser vendor like Mozilla, I suppose; Apple has an answer for publishers to the often shitty experience of web advertising: don’t use the web, use apps with iAds, use Apple News, use Apple Music, use Apple… Apple’s answer isn’t a better web, really, it’s Apple’s iOS ecosystem.
Mark Mayo

Emphasis is mine …

Firefox dumping Google as default search engine, what’s to expect?

As Firefox dumps Google for Yahoo, is the clock ticking for Mozilla? →

A nice, facts/money-checking, post via TheGuardian.com on the incoming move by Mozilla Foundation to replace Google as the default search engine in favor of locally choosen alternatives (Yahoo, Baidu, Yandex & co.)