about JavaScript

However, JavaScript is what probably killed TenFourFox quickest. For better or for worse, web browsers’ primary role is no longer to view documents; it is to view applications that, by sheer coincidence, sometimes resemble documents. You can make workarounds to gracefully degrade where we have missing HTML or DOM features, but JavaScript is pretty much run or don’t, and more and more sites just plain collapse if any portion of it doesn’t. Nowadays front ends have become impossible to debug by outsiders and the liberties taken by JavaScript minifiers are demonstrably not portable. No one cares because it works okay on the subset of browsers they want to support, but someone bringing up the rear like we are has no chance because you can’t look at the source map and no one on the dev side has interest in or time for helping out the little guy.

Cameron Kaiser

Outside of WordPress, all major open source CMSs are declining.

I’ve gone through the list of CMSs and looked up whether they’re open source or not. On the whole, in the beginning of 2018, open source CMSs combined had a 41.6% market share. Now they command 43.4% and if the trends continue the way they’re looking, it’ll be 45.7% this time next year.

Now, those open source totals obscure an important fact:

  • without WordPress, open source CMSs would have lost a full percentage point over the course of this year, from 9.4% to 8.4%.
  • if the trends continue, the group of open source CMSs – excluding WordPress – will decrease next year as well, to 7.6%.

So, while WordPress is shining and growing, the open source CMS ecosystem outside of WordPress isn’t getting stronger. We’ve seen the first moves for Gutenberg to be adopted by Drupal, maybe it’s time for more collaboration to prevent further decline?

Joost de Valk

Joost on his analysis has pointed out lots of data to study. Every aspect is important but – to my heart – this is the situation that needs more analysis from every developer out there. Clearly there’s something in the WordPress community that’s winning, and avoiding learning the good things this project has put on the table in its 15 years of existence is leading to… nothing.

So it would be better to cooperate each other and try to compensate the bad things each project has and elevate the strongest points…

The Cost of Contribution

… as WordPress was not the development tool I had hoped it would be, mainly because it prioritizes end-users over developers (and for a valid reason). And just when I considered switching, I experienced the one thing that has continued to keep me in this space: the WordPress Community.
It’s a community full of passioned and inspiring people, and when you come into contact with it for the first time, it can be very intoxicating – I was hooked right away!
But with time, I noticed more and more that this highly inspiring and addicting environment did have a negative long-term effect on some community members.

Alain Schlesser

WordCamp Bari 2018 is here!

After two years of work, the entire Apulian community of WordPress users and developers has managed to be granted the ‘right’ to make a WordCamp.

Next May 11 and 12, 2018 we wait all the interested WordPress enthusiast from all over the world to come in Bari and participate to our event.

https://2018.bari.wordcamp.org

Save the date!!!

… and don’t esitate to ask me, or the team, any question you have in case of need! We are on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, or you can drop us a line!

Linus Torvalds Explains How Linux Still Surprises and Motivates Him

“When I sat down and wrote Git, a prime principle was that you should be able to fork and go off on your own and do something on your own. If you have forks that are friendly — the type that prove me wrong and do something interesting that improves the kernel — in that situation, someone can come back and say they actually improved the kernel and there are no bad feelings. I’ll take your improved code and merge it back. That’s why you should encourage forks. You also want to make it easy to take back the good ones.”

Linus Torvalds, via →

ScudCloud – an unofficial Slack client for Linux

ScudCloud_screenshot
ScudCloud is a non official open-source Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mint, Arch, Fedora) desktop client app for Slack.

ScudCloud improves the Slack integration with Linux desktops featuring:

  • multiple teams support
  • native system notifications
  • count of unread direct mentions at launcher/systray icon
  • alert/wobbling on new messages
  • channels quicklist (Unity only)
  • optional tray notifications and “Close to Tray”
  • follow your desktop activity and will stay online while you’re logged in (if correct packages are installed)

The Biggest Threat to WordPress Isn’t Another CMS

As open source communities develop, you begin to attract a dedicated group of cheerleaders, advocates, and enthusiasts–people who are so grateful to be involved that they will bend over backwards to help advance the cause. But on the flip side, as you become more mainstream, you also begin to see the other crowds that gather–the cynical, the skeptical, the trolls, the people with literally zero respect for anyone. People who would rather see you fail than succeed. People who think their opinions and perspectives are so much righter than yours, they don’t care how bad it makes them look to take a proverbial dump on the people who actually *built* the thing in the first place.

Let’s all take a few minutes to be grateful for the opportunity to make a living off the hard work of thousands of other people who donated their time and code to build something that has made a huge impact on the Internet and in people’s actual lives.
Chris Wallace

The Dehumanizing Myth of the Meritocracy

The Dehumanizing Myth of the Meritocracy