suggested reads for May 20, 2018

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Here’s my suggested reading list for this Sunday. Last week I forgot to post, given the aftermaths of the first edition of the WordCamp Bari 2018, sorry. If you have time for just a single articole… well, my choice has been put in evidence 😉

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What makes a tree a tree?

A fascinating journey into the world of plant genetics!

… maybe it’s time to start thinking of tree as a verb, rather than a noun — tree-ing, or tree-ifying. It’s a strategy, a way of being, like swimming or flying, even though to our eyes it’s happening in very slow motion. Tree-ing with no finish in sight — until an ax, or a pest, or a bolt of Thanksgiving lightning strikes it down.

via →

scientific publications have to make transition to open science

“An inherent principle of publication is that others should be able to replicate and build upon the authors’ published claims. Therefore, a ondition of publication in a Nature journal is that authors are required to make materials, data and associated protocols available to readers promptly on request.”

Nature, Availability of data and materials

OpenSource.com Magazine last June 12nd published an interesting (and promising) article on Nature Methods, one of the most respected scientific publications in the world, shifting with decision to an ‘open science’ model for its articles approval process…

a game changer

Researcher Natalia Ivanova was parsing this data when she noticed something strange: several bacteria had really short genes, around 200 nucleotides long, a far cry from the more typical 800-900 nucleotide length she was expecting. Short genes mean short proteins, and in this case, seemingly nonfunctional ones. The only way to make it coherent was if “stop” codons didn’t actually mean “stop”.

Ivanova experimented computationally with various codon reassignments, and ultimately found that things looked a lot more normal if “opal” was translated as a glycine amino acid. In other words, “the same word means different things in different organisms,” says Eddy Rubin, JGI’s Director. The microbial world is multilingual.

Wired, Is DNA multilingual?