Right now vendors have no real incentive to offer any kind of compatibility with each other. Instead they’re all trying to define their own ecosystems with their own incompatible protocols with the aim of forcing users to continue buying from them. Worse, they attempt to restrict developers from implementing any kind of compatibility layers. The inevitable outcome is going to be either stacks of discarded devices speaking abandoned protocols or a cottage industry of developers writing bridge code and trying to avoid DMCA takedowns.

The dystopian future we’re heading towards isn’t Gibsonian giant megacorporations engaging in physical warfare, it’s one where buying a new toaster means replacing all your lightbulbs or discovering that the code making your home alarm system work is now considered a copyright infringement. Is there a market where I can invest in IP lawyers?
Mattew Garret


  • Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It – a Wired.com post on the security of the automotive industry. Personally I’m really scared by this since the general approach I see is driven by a “We Can Do This!” mentality other than a safer – and more conscious – attention to all the risks that this kind of software, linked on an unsecure network, attempts to human lives;
  • The Web we have to save – a wonderful post. A melting one. True in every word and broken hope. Thinking about it, maybe it deserved to be given a post on his own;
  • Business models, working hours and the crazy ICT in Italy – maybe someone told you to come to Italy to work, here’s an honest hands-on story of the state of the art of ICT jobs here. My – and not only mine – daily struggle…
  • The Post-Mac Interface – “20 years later, did the Anti-Mac Interface unseat the original Macintosh design principles?
  • Your big data toolchain is a big security risk! – another giant with feet of clay in the ICT world. Big Datas, managed more by buzzwords than actual durable, sustainable, reliable technologies;