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The last two articles proposed are really dear to my heart and feelings on how the web has to grow to be a better version of ourselves… and the last one is one of the most intelligent and greatly written post on the topics I’ve ever read.

Not OK, Google

What he does not say is far more interesting, i.e. that in order to offer its promise of “custom convenience” — with predictions about restaurants you might like to eat at, say, or suggestions for how bad the traffic might be on your commute to work — it is continuously harvesting and data-mining your personal information, preferences, predilections, peccadilloes, prejudices… and so on and on and on.

AI never stops needing data. Not where fickle humans are concerned.

So the actual price for building a “personal Google for everyone, everywhere” would in fact be zero privacy for everyone, everywhere.

Doesn’t sound quite so OK, Google, now does it?
Natasha Lomas

… via the homonym post on TechCrunch!

People wonder why their daughter is taking 10,000 photos a day. What they don’t realize is that she isn’t preserving images. She’s talking. It’s not about an accumulation of photos defining who you are. It’s about instant expression and who you are right now. Internet-connected photography is really a reinvention of the camera. And what it does is allow you to share your experience of the world while also seeing everyone else’s experience of the world, everywhere, all the time.
Evan Spiegel

via bicyiclemind