Designers and programmers are great at inventing software. We obsess over every aspect of that process: the tech we use, our methodology, the way it looks, and how it performs.
Unfortunately we’re not nearly as obsessed with what happens after that, when people integrate our products into the real world. They use our stuff and it takes on a life of its own. Then we move on to making the next thing. We’re builders, not sociologists.
This approach wasn’t a problem when apps were mostly isolated tools people used to manage spreadsheets or send emails. Small products with small impacts.
But now most software is so much more than that. It listens to us. It goes everywhere we go. It tracks everything we do. It has our fingerprints. Our heart rate. Our money. Our location. Our face. It’s the primary way we communicate our thoughts and feelings to our friends and family.
It’s deeply personal and ingrained into every aspect of our lives. It commands our gaze more and more every day.
Jonas Downey

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So, yes, important things will get saved. But that doesn’t feel like a solid argument for how preservation happens.

Maybe those things weren’t saved because they were important. Maybe they were important because they were saved.

In order to write a history, you need evidence of what happened. When we talk about preserving the stuff we make on the web, it isn’t because we think a Facebook status update, or those GeoCities sites have such significance now. It’s because we can’t know.
Jason Santa Maria

My point is: We don’t read anymore, which also means we don’t dive into topics, or do our research to form our own opinion. Yet, at the same time we still comment, scream & share. As you can imagine, as a result our online platforms are full of uninformed people sharing or commenting on things they have no idea about. If you would know that more than 60% of all content shared by your friends wasn’t even read by them, would you even bother to click or engage with it? I don’t think so, because it’s nothing more but garbage.
Tobias van Schneider

A quote from ‘The Desk’, issue n°109 of Tobias’ newsletter.